Tag Archives: Battle of Fort Sanders

Crowded Camp Chase

Union prison Camp Chase, just west of Ohio’s state capital of Columbus, where some of the Rebs captured at Fort Sanders spent the rest of the war—or, in some cases, their lives. Commissioned and non-commissioned officers got the wooden barracks … Continue reading

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View of College Hill

Post-battle Union lines photo of College Hill (buildings, top, right center) across the Holston River, looking to the east, possibly even the northeast. The hill was from where the Thirty-Fourth Battery New York Artillery kept up desultory fire all night … Continue reading

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More from Lieutenant Parker

Ezra Parker, first lieutenant of Battery D, First Rhode Island Light Artillery, wrote a good post-war memoir on the fighting in and around Knoxville. Here he is on the fight at Campbell’s Station with the Rebel artillery: “This battery we … Continue reading

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Hie thee to the street corner

That is, if you wish to commemorate the Battle of Fort Sanders during these Sesquicentennial years of the war. Supposedly, near the intersection of Seventeenth Street and Laurel Avenue is where the fort’s pivotal northwest bastion was sited, until neglect, … Continue reading

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Micah Jenkins

Some Rebel officers may have privately questioned Gen. Longstreet’s judgment in regard to preparation for the attack on Fort Sanders, but South Carolinian Micah Jenkins was the only one who complained directly to him. And when the disaster had unfolded, … Continue reading

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Drummer boys

All of the troops were, affectionately, called boys. Some of them literally were. Younger than sixteen, anyhow, including the youngest casualty of the Battle of Fort Sanders, a fourteen-year-old drummer boy of the Second Michigan. But a few drummer boys … Continue reading

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Nursing the wounded

Howard Pyle’s Civil War art, an illustration for a 19th century magazine story, keyed to the text and titled “I thought of you when I fell.” Not precisely my idea of what Mrs. Parthenia Leila Ellis looked like, but probably … Continue reading

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