A Knoxville newspaper in North Carolina

Hometown Southern newspapers were scattered across the South in July of 1864, according to the Richmond Whig. Including the Knoxville Register which “after visiting sundry places is now in Charlotte, N. C.” It was not alone:

“Fugitive Papers.—We have in our southern and southwestern exchanges constant evidence of the extent to which our people have been driven from their homes and forced to seek refuge at some other point.

“The ‘Memphis Appeal,’ now published in Atlanta, has made three moves, starting from Memphis to a point in Northern Mississippi, from which point it moved to Jackson, Mississippi; from Jackson it moved to Atlanta, and this may not be its last move, since Sherman threatens to drive it out of its pleasant place of refuge.

“‘The Chattanooga Rebel’ being driven out when we gave up Tennessee, retired to Marietta, and finding Sherman lately in too close proximity to that town, has made another move and is now in Griffin, Ga. ‘The Knoxville Register,’ after visiting sundry places is now in Charlotte, N. C.

“Of course the Mississippi papers are very much fugitives, there being but one published regularly within the State, we think—the ‘Clarion,’ published at Meridian.  The Jackson papers are gone to Selma, Alabama, and elsewhere.  Northern Alabama papers spring up to greet us from unexpected places, still holding on to their old names.

“There has indeed been a scattering and a dispersion.  The columns of the press have literally become ‘movable columns,’ and work their way from one side of the Confederacy to another in search of a resting place.—Wilmington Journal.”

Of course, Parson Brownlow’s Knoxville Whig & Rebel Ventilator was out of business altogether, it’s steam presses turned to use making rifled barrels for Confederate muskets.

Via University of Texas at Tyler & Poore Boys In Gray

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About Dick Stanley

Retired Texas daily newspaperman
This entry was posted in Knoxville, Parson William Brownlow and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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